Cosmetic allergy, organic ingredients
July 22 2016 by
Ray Sahelian, M.D.
 

Many new natural supplements have been introduced in the past few years as nutrients that could influence skin health. These are vitamin E, vitamin C, lipoic acid, quercetin, DMAE, evodia extract, pomegranate extract, epa, hyaluronan promoters and hyaluronic acid, and nitric oxide inducers.

 

Cosmetic Allergy

About 20% of women and 10% of men experience some sort of adverse reaction to a personal care product over the course of a year. Although most of these reactions may be due to subjective sensory irritation, various studies reveal that up to 10% of dermatologic patients who are patch tested are allergic to cosmetic products or their constituent ingredients. Some of these products include deodorants and perfumes, skin care products, hair care products (especially hair and beard dyes), and nail cosmetics. Allergic contact dermatitis mainly results from fragrance chemicals and preservatives. Additional fragrance chemicals may need to be tested in order to identify those patients 'missed' by the current fragrance mix; in particular, hydroxy-isohexyl-3-cyclohexene carboxaldehyde (HMPPC Lyral) has been singled out as an important sensitizing agent. The increased usage of natural fragrances and botanic extracts can also cause problems in their own right or through co-reactivity. The preservative methyldibromo glutaronitrile has also been recognized as an increasingly important cosmetic sensitizer in Europe, which has led to the recent recommendation that it should be prohibited from 'leave-on' products until information on 'safe' consumer levels becomes available. Other emerging cosmetic allergens include UV filters, tosylamide / formaldehyde resin, and nail acrylates. The diagnosis of cosmetic allergy can be confirmed with patch testing, including testing of 'whole' products, when necessary, and repeat open application tests can be used to confirm the relevance of reactions in cases of doubt.

 

The term cosmeceutical was coined in 1980 by Dr. Albert Kligman to define a topical preparation sold as a cosmetic but with pharmaceutical action. Many topical cosmeceuticals have been marketed for a number of skin conditions including pigmentation problems, telangectasias (dilated superficial blood vessels), and wrinkles.

 

Skin Cosmetic ingredients
There are countless ingredients in cosmetic products. I will add additional names to this cosmetic ingredient list in the future. See bottom of page a fuller list of cosmetic ingredients.

Aloe PG Ext 10:1
Alpha hydroxy acid (AHA)
Apple PG Ext
Beta hydroxy acid (BHA)
Carmine cosmetic
Chakunda PG Ext $35.00
Glycerol is an anti-irritant. Anti-irritants are added to cosmetic formulations because of their beneficial effect on irritated skin. Glycerol has shown anti-irritant properties in experimentally induced irritation from sodium lauryl sulfate and nonanoic acid.
Henna PG Ext 10:1 $35.00
Hibiscus PG Ext
Limonene and linalool are common fragrance terpenes widely used in cosmetic, household and hygiene products.
Myrrh PG Ext 10:1 $50.00
Orange Peel PG Ex 10:1 $32.00
Papaya PG Ext 10:1
Parabens are often used in cosmetic skin care products.
Red Sandal PG Ext 10:1 $50.00
Rose Flower PG Ext 10:1 $38.00

What are 'hypoallergenic' cosmetics?
"Hypoallergenic" cosmetics are products that manufacturers claim produce fewer allergic reactions than other cosmetic products. Consumers with hypersensitive skin, and even those with "normal" skin, may be led to believe that these products will be gentler than non-hypoallergenic cosmetics.
There are no federal standards or definitions that govern the use of the term "hypoallergenic." The term means whatever a particular company wants it to mean. Manufacturers of cosmetics labeled as hypoallergenic are not required to submit substantiation of their hypoallergenicity claims to FDA.
The term "hypoallergenic" may have considerable market value in promoting cosmetic products to consumers on a retail basis, but dermatologists say it has very little meaning.

 

Contact Dermatitis due to Cosmetic Products
In a study done at the Department of Skin, V.D. & Leprosy, Pt. B.D.S. Post Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Rohtak-124001 (Haryana), India., fifty patients of both sexes with clinically suspected cosmetic dermatitis were subjected to patch testing with a cosmetic and fragrance series. Most of these patients were young adults between 10-29 years. The majority of the patients had cosmetic dermatitis of  less than one year duration. The occupational profiles of the patients included students (46%), housewives (18%), teachers (10%) and laborers (4%). A miscellaneous group, comprised of tailors, farmers, staff nurses, beauticians, jewellers and engineers, accounted for the remaining 22%. The most commonly involved site was the face, followed by the forehead, neck and scalp. Patch testing of these patients revealed that, out of the 50 subjects tested, thirty-three (66%) reacted to one or more allergens. Fragrance components were the most common offending allergen (51.5%) followed by preservatives (39%), paraphenylenediamine (PPD) (21%), and cetrimide and tertiary butyl hydroquinone (12% each), in descending order of frequency. Hence, patch testing, with the standard series supplemented by personal cosmetics; should be considered for patients with cosmetic dermatitis to determine the offending allergen so as to avoid further contact with that allergen.

Cosmetic References
J Dermatol. 2005 Dec;32(12):951-5. Contact allergies to cosmetics: testing with 52 cosmetic ingredients and personal products.

 

Potential Harm from Cosmetic Products

Cosmetics are products of chemical or natural origin specifically for application on skin. The constant evolution of the cosmetic industry has generated the necessity to carry out microbiological analysis on the raw materials used in the industrial production of cosmetics as well as the final products, with the purpose of obtaining products of good microbiological quality. Cosmetic products are recognized to be substrates for the survival and development of a large variety of microorganisms, since they possess some of the nutrients that facilitate growth such as: lipids, polysaccharides, alcohol, proteins, amino acids, glucosides, esteroids, peptides, and vitamins. Also, the conditions of readiness (oxygenation, pH, temperature, osmotic degree, superficial activity, perfume, and essential oils) present in the cosmetic products favor microbial multiplication.Routine analyses to determine the microbiological quality of a cosmetic product include the following: Count of mesophilic aerobic microorganisms. Most probable number (MPN) of total coliforms. Count of molds and yeasts. Absence/presence of Staphylococcus aureus probe. Absence/presence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa probe.

 

Cosmetic surgery
Less than 10 percent of adults in the US has ever had some type of cosmetic surgery, yet almost twice as many hope to do so at some point in the future. Trends have changed significantly since the 1960s and 1970s when cosmetic surgery was "rarely talked about, said" Jeff Knezovich, executive vice president of the American Academy of Cosmetic Surgery (AACS), which sponsored the survey.

 

J Drugs Dermatol. 2015. Cosmetic complications: rare and serious events following botulinum toxin and soft tissue filler administration. Botulinum toxin (BTX) and soft tissue fillers continue to gain in popularity due to their safety, affordability, quick effects, and short recovery times. With the excellent safety profile of BTX and soft tissue fillers, patients may develop a nonchalant attitude towards treatment with injectables. However, it is important for both patient and physician to be familiar with all the possible complications, both common and uncommon. Complications of BTX included dry eye syndrome, strabismus and diplopia, superficial temporal artery pseudoaneurysm, neck weakness, hoarseness, and dysphagia. Complications associated with soft tissue fillers included tissue necrosis, inflammatory nodules, hypersensitivity reaction, and blindness and cerebral ischemia.

 

Herbal supplement use is prevalent in the facial cosmetic surgery population, especially in the older female population. Considering the potential effects of these products on surgery and recovery, awareness and careful documentation and prohibiting the patients from the consumption of these products will increase the safety and reduce the recovery following cosmetic procedures.

 

Cosmetic Industry Regulation
There are two laws that govern the cosmetics industry: the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FD&C Act) and the Fair Packaging and Labeling Act (FPLA). The FD&C Act prohibits the marketing of adulterated or misbranded cosmetics resulting from ingredients, contaminants, processing, packaging and even shipping and handling. This act provides a measure of safety. The FPLA subjects companies to regulatory action if their products are improperly labeled, misbranded or deceptively packaged. FPLA also requires that cosmetic products declare their ingredients. With the exception of color additives, cosmetic products and ingredients are not subject to FDA pre-market approval. In other words, the onus is on the company to substantiate the safety of its product and ensure it is labeled properly


Anti Aging Cosmetic
A popular trend in the promotion of anti-aging cosmetics is to use dermatologists who develop their own product lines, with their name and face making up a good chunk of the marketing materials. One well known figure is Dr. Nicholas Perricone, who has taken his theories on inflammation to TV segments, several books and a cosmetic product line. Patricia Wexler is another dermatologist with a product line bearing her name. Her philosophy is “Every skin is aging skin. You can try to prevent it or repair. My products do both.”
   The majority of skin damage results from ultraviolet (UV) exposure. The resulting collective biochemical changes and alterations in structural integrity are termed photo damage. Collagen breakdown, chronic skin inflammation and the accumulation of abnormal elastin in the superficial dermis lead to wrinkles, mottled coloration and skin laxity. Many active ingredients found in anti-aging cosmetics range from the more obscure, like sirtuin (from soybean cuticle fibers) and caviar extracts, to the very common, such as vitamin C. Additional ingredients that can be found in anti-aging cosmetics include rosemarinic acid (rosemary extract) and tea extracts.

 

Hormone in Cosmetic Products and Breast Cancer
Overall breast cancer rates have fallen among US women in recent years, but haven't significantly changed among young African-American women. This might be partially explained by cosmetic products containing estrogens and placenta, which are more widely used by African Americans. The current generation of young white women face a 21-percent increased risk of being diagnosed with breast cancer, but that risk is 41-percent higher among young African-American women. Exposure to hormones in cosmetic products could be a factor. Cosmetic products containing estrogens and placenta are more widely used among African Americans, and that exposure to such products may begin in infancy. Makers of cosmetic care products are not required to disclose their hormone contents if they are considered "trade secrets," even though the Food and Drug Administration currently regards personal care products that contain hormones as drugs and subject to regulation.

The following are some substances used in cosmetic products:

Allantoin used in creams for soothing skin irritation.
AMMONIUM LAURYL ETHER SULPHATE
AMMONIUM THIOGLYCOLATE
APIGENIN
APRICOT KERNEL OIL
ARBUTIN
ASCORBIC ACID
AVOBENZONE
AVOCADO OIL
AZELAIC ACID

BENZALKONIUM CHLORIDE (80)
BENZOCAINE
BEESWAX
BENZOPHENONE 3/4/5/12
BENZOYL PEROXIDE
BETA CAROTENE
BETAINE
BHA (butyl hydroxyacetone)
BHT (butylated hydroxytoluene)
BRONOPOL

Calcium hydroxide - Women who use chemical relaxers to straighten their hair do not seem to be at increased risk of breast cancer. There's no evidence that the major ingredients in hair relaxers -- such as lye and calcium hydroxide -- promote cancer. Since manufacturers need not list all of the ingredients they use in cosmetics (as some are considered trade secrets), it's not clear whether some of these substances used in cosmetics might be harmful.
CAPROIC ACID
CAPRYLIC CAPIRC TRIGLYCERIDE
CARAGEENAN GUM
CETYL ALCOHOL
CETYL STEARYL ALCOHOL
CETRIMIDE
CETRIMONIUM CHRLORIDE
CHLORAMINE T
CHLORHEXIDINE GLUCONATE - for more information on gluconate click on the link provided
CHROMIUM OXIDE
CITRIC ACID
COCOA BUTTER
COCODIETHANOL AMIDE (PURE)
CURCUMIN
CYSTAMINE DIHYDROCHLORIDE

D-BIOTIN
DHA (dihydroxy acetone)
DIAZOLIDINYL UREA
DIMETHICONE
DISODIUM EDTA
D PANTHENOL
DMDM HYDANTOIN
DMAE is an amino acid that may help increase skin integrity.
DOMIPHEN BROMIDE

ELLAGIC ACID
ESTRADIOL
ESTRONE
ETHYL PARABEN
EUCALYPTUS OIL
EVENING PRIMROSE

GRAPE SEED OIL
GLYCERINE
GLYCYRRHETINIC ACID
GLYCYRRIZINATE
GRAPE SEED EXTRACT 95%
GREEN TEA EXTRACT 98%
GUAR GUM

HAZEL NUT OIL
HEXACHLOROPHENE
HOMOSALATE
Hyaluronic acid is present in the human body as a component of connective tissue where it provides a framework for the skin. It is FDA approved as a skin filler where it binds water providing volume to fill in areas such as nasolabial folds.
HYDROCORTISONE
HYDROGENATED CASTOR OIL
HYDROQUINONE

ICTTHAMMOL
IMIDAZOLIDINYL UREA (IMIDUREA)
ISOPROPYL MYRISTATE
ISOPROPYL PALMITATE

JOJOBA OIL

Kinetin is a synthetic cytokinin plant growth hormone that has been shown in vitro to delay the onset and decrease the extent of skin aging.
KOJIC ACID
KOJIC ACID DIPALMITATE

LANOLIN
LAURIC ACID
L-CYSTEINE
L-HISTIDINE
LICORICE-E
LIDOCAINE BASE / HCL
L-TYROSINE
Lye

MACADAMIA NUT OIL
Magnesium Ascorbyl phosphate is used as a bleaching agent in cosmetic products
MAGNESIUM CARBONATE
MAGNESIUM STEARATE
MATRICARIA
MENTHOL
METHYL ANTHRANELATE
METHYL SALICYLATE

N-ACETYL TYROSINE

O-CTYL METHOXYCINNAMATE
OCTYL DIMETHYL PABA
OCTISALATE
Oleyl Alcohol - Allergic contact dermatitis from oleyl alcohol in Elidel cream. Contact Dermatitis. 2006 Dec;55(6):354-6. Department of Dermatology and Allergy Center, Odense University Hospital, University of Southern Denmark, DK-5000, Odense, Denmark. We report an atopic dermatitis patient with recurrent hand dermatitis who developed a severe allergic contact dermatitis from the use of cosmetic product Elidel cream. Diagnostic patch tests showed an isolated contact allergy to the emulsifier oleyl alcohol present in the product. Pimecrolimus appeared to have had an aggravating effect on the dermatitis in spite of its immunosuppressive effects. The initial clinical appearance of the patient's widespread dermatitis was atypical with resemblance to subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus. Even though emulsifiers are widely used in topical products, contact allergic reactions to these are relatively uncommon.
OLIVE OILS
OTOCRYLENE

PANTETHINE
PEACH KERNAL OIL
P-AMINOBENZOIC ACID
PARA-CHLORO-M-XYLENOL
PEG/200/400/1500
PETROLATUM
POLYSORBATE 20/80
POTASSIUM SORBATE
POVIDONE IODINE
PRAMOXINE HCL
PROGESTERONE
PROPYL GALLATE
PROPYL PARABEN
PUMPKIN SEED OIL
PVP-K-30

RESORCINOL
ROYAL JELLY

SHEA BUTTER
SODIUM ALGINATE
SODIUM ASCORBYL PHOSPHATE
SODIUM BENZOATE
SODIUM CITRATE
SODIUM COCOYL ISETHIONATE
SODIUM LAURYL ETHER SULPHATE
SODIUM LAURYL SULPHATE
Sodium metabisulfite or sodium pyrosulfite (American spelling; English spelling is Sodium metabisulphite or sodium pyrosulphite) is an inorganic compound of chemical formula Na2S2O5. The name is sometimes referred to as disodium (metabisulfite, etc). It is used as a sterilizer and antioxidant and preservative.
SOY ISOFLAVONE 40%
SQUALENE
STEARIC ACID, TRIPLE PRESSED
STEARYL ALCOHOL
SWEET ALMOND OIL

TANNIC ACID
TEA TREE OIL
TERTIARY BUTYL HYDROQUINONE (TBHQ)
THIOGLYCOLIC ACID
TITANIUM DIOXIDE
TRICLOSAN
TRIETHYL CITRATE

VIT. A PALMITATE
VIT. C PALMITATE
VIT. E (NATURAL / SYNTHETIC)
VIT. K1

XANTHAN GUM

ZINC GLUCONATE
ZINC PYRITHIONE
ZINC UNDECYLENATE
ZINC OXIDE

 

Cosmetics concerns about the face
A human's face is made up 16 anatomically distinct compartments that gain and lose fatty tissue independently of one another. Hence, one part of the face may sag independently of another part of the face.

 

Is a skin cream a drug or a cosmetic?
The following is language from the FDA's Cosmetics Guide: "As defined in section 201(i) of the FD&C Act, a cosmetic is a product, except soap, intended to be applied to the human body for cleansing, beautifying, promoting attractiveness or altering the appearance. In short, one may say that a cosmetic is a product intended to exert a physical, and not a physiological, effect on the human body. According to Senate Report No. 493 and court decisions, the term "intended" in the legal definition of the term "cosmetic" or in other definitions means, with respect to the use of a product, its directed or prescribed use as determined from the statements made on a product's label or labeling. The courts, in deciding whether a product is a "cosmestic", a "drug", or both a "drug" and a "cosmetic", have relied principally on the consumer's perception of the meaning of a label statement and less so on the interpretation of the meaning of a label statement by the labeler or a regulatory agency. A cosmetic is legally also a drug if it is intended to exert a physical as well as a physiological effect because the FD&C Act defines in section 201(g) the term "drug" to mean, among other things, "articles intended for use in the ... cure, mitigation, treatment, or prevention of disease ... and ... articles ... intended to affect the structure or any function of the body ..."  Section 509 of the FD&C Act provides that the categories of "drug" and "cosmetic" are not mutually exclusive.

 

Organic and Natural Cosmetics
European Sales of Natural Cosmetics Reaching EUR 1 billion
2006-09-19 - Organic Monitor
London – Sales of natural & organic cosmetics are projected to surpass the EUR 1 billion mark for the first time this year. New research by Organic Monitor finds that European revenues have been increasing by over 20% a year. Widening availability and strengthening consumer demand are the major drivers of market growth. Availability of natural & organic cosmetics is increasing in European retailers with some launching private label products. Initially most demand for natural cosmetics was from consumers who suffered from ailments like skin rashes and allergies, however demand has broadened in recent years. Many are turning to natural cosmetics as they contain minimal levels of synthetic substances like parabens and petrochemicals. Others are turning to natural products because of the functionality of natural ingredients and / or traceability of organic ingredients. Organic food consumers are favouring these products as they realise chemicals in cosmetics could possibly be as harmful as chemicals in foods. The German and French markets are the fastest growing in Europe. Whilst the French market started showing high growth in 2005, natural cosmetic sales have been booming in Germany for a number of years. The popularity of natural cosmetics with German consumers has led drugstores, organic food retailers and even discounters to launch private label products. As a consequence, natural cosmetics are the most widely available and most competitively priced in the German market. Organic Monitor’s new report on The European Market for Natural Cosmetics, finds the German and Italian markets to be the largest in Europe, comprising almost 70% of revenues. Natural cosmetics are highly established in Germany where they comprise over 4% of total cosmetic sales; the market share is forecast to approach 10% by 2012. Natural cosmetics also have high market share in other German-speaking countries like Austria and Switzerland. The supply-side is highly fragmented with over 400 European companies involved in producing natural cosmetics. Most are small producers, with very few companies having a regional presence. Weleda is the leading producer of natural cosmetics in Europe; the Swiss company has a strong market position in almost every European country. However, its market share is being eroded by new entrants. High growth rates are attracting new entrants, which include large cosmetic companies that are launching natural and organic products. The study finds a major barrier to market growth and consumer trust in natural cosmetics is the lack of industry regulation. Unlike organic foods, there are no national and EU regulations for natural & organic cosmetics. As a result, legitimate products are competing against conventional cosmetics that are marketed as ‘natural’ because they contain some natural ingredients. The inconsistency between private standards of natural & organic cosmetics is also stifling consumer demand; consumers are unable to differentiate between products that are certified by organisations like BDIH and Soil Association. Recommendations are given to existing producers and new entrants in this emerging market. A critical success factor for natural cosmetics is product positioning, especially as these products become in direct competition with conventional brands in supermarkets, department stores and drugstores. The report author quotes, ‘market winners will be those companies that can successfully differentiate their products from competing ones; natural and conventional’.

 

Number of cosmetics and chemicals on a woman in England
The average British woman has 515 chemicals on her body every day. The poll of 2,016 women by deodorant-maker Bionsen said most of the pollutants are self-inflicted by women who sprayed on deodorant, put on body moisturizer and applied lipstick. Today's average British woman uses body and facial moisturizers, perfumes, deodorants and various other make-up products, which leave them unknowingly carrying hundreds of chemicals on their bodies throughout the day,. Moisturizer can contain over 30 different chemicals and perfume up to 400. "Women have never been more image-conscious and their beauty regimes have changed dramatically over the years, from a simple 'wash & go' attitude, to daily fake tan applications, regular manicures, false lashes and hair extensions," Bionsen's Charlotte Smith said in a statement. Eight out of the 12 areas on the body highlighted by Bionsen as places where women used cosmetic products containing chemicals were on the face or head and included moisturizers, foundation, blush, eye make-up, hair spray and perfume head or face.