Irvingia gabonensis fruit for weight loss, African mango diet pill? Does it help with weight loss?
December 2 2015 by Ray Sahelian, M.D.

Irvingia gabonensis is also known as African mango, a fruit commonly eaten in West Africa. Irvingia gabonensis is used medicinally in most parts of tropical Africa for the treatment of a number of ailments. In West Africa the Mende tribe of Sierra Leone uses the stem bark to relieve pain. Research shows this plant extract may be helpful as a natural diet pill but studies have shown conflicting results.

My comments
There are many internet websites that are promoting products with this herb for weight loss, often called African Mango diet pill. I think it is premature at this time to make such claims until more studies are done by different centers to confirm that such weight loss does occur and is permanent, and to make sure no serious side effects occur with this "African Mango Diet."

J Diet Suppl. 2013. The efficacy of Irvingia gabonensis supplementation in the management of overweight and obesity: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials. The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) involving the use of the African Bush Mango, Irvingia gabonensis for body weight reduction in obese and overweight individuals. Electronic and nonelectronic searches were conducted to identify relevant RCTs. The bibliographies of located articles were also searched. No age, gender, or language restrictions were imposed. The reporting quality of identified RCTs was assessed using a methodological checklist adapted from the Consolidated Standard of Reporting Trials Statement and Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses guidelines. Two reviewers independently determined eligibility and assessed the reporting quality of included studies. Three RCTs were identified, and all were included. The RCTs all had flaws in the reporting of their methodology. All RCTs reported statistically significant reductions in body weight and waist circumference favoring I. gabonensis over placebo. The results from the RCTs also suggest positive effects of I. gabonensis supplementation on the blood lipid profile. Adverse events included headache and sleep difficulty. Due to the paucity and poor reporting quality of the RCTs, the effect of I. gabonensis on body weight and related parameters are unproven. Therefore, this plant cannot be recommended as a weight loss aid.

Weight loss fruit extract
An extract derived from Irvingia gabonensis, a West African fruit, may help those with a few extra pounds lose some weight and lower their cholesterol level. Extracts from the seeds inhibits body fat production, through effects on certain genes and enzymes that regulate metabolism. Researchers at the University of Yaounde in Cameroon assigned 102 obese adults to take either the fruit extract or a placebo twice a day for 10 weeks. By the end of the study, the Irvingia gabonensis extract group had lost an average of roughly 12 kilograms while the placebo group had no change in weight. The LDL cholesterol levels were reduced in those on the fruit extract. Dr. Julius E. Oben and his colleagues report the findings in the online journal Lipids in Health and Disease. The Fairfield, California- based Gateway Health Alliances, Inc. supplied the Irvingia gabonensis extract and partially funded the research. Lipids in Health and Disease, 2009.

IGOB131, a novel seed extract of the West African plant Irvingia gabonensis, significantly reduces body weight and improves metabolic parameters in overweight humans in a randomized double-blind placebo controlled investigation.
A recent in vitro study indicates that IGOB131, a novel seed extract of the traditional West African food plant Irvingia gabonensis, favorably impacts adipogenesis through a variety of critical metabolic pathways including PPAR gamma, leptin, adiponectin, and glycerol-3 phosphate dehydrogenase. This study was therefore aimed at evaluating the effects of IGOB131, an extract of Irvingia gabonensis, on body weight and associated metabolic parameters in overweight human volunteers. The study participants comprised of 102 healthy, overweight and/or obese volunteers randomly divided into two groups. The groups received on a daily basis, either 150 mg of IGOB131 or matching placebo in a double blinded fashion, 30-60 minutes before lunch and dinner. Significant improvements in body weight, body fat, and waist circumference as well as plasma total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, blood glucose, C-reactive protein, adiponectin and leptin levels were observed in the IGOB131 group compared with the placebo group.  Irvingia gabonensis administered 150 mg twice daily before meals to overweight and/or obese human volunteers favorably impacts body weight and a variety of parameters characteristic of the metabolic syndrome. This is the first double blind randomized placebo controlled clinical trial regarding the anti-obesity and lipid profile modulating effects of an Irvingia gabonensis extract. Lipids Health Dis. 2009. Ngondi JL, Etoundi BC, Nyangono CB, Mbofung CM, Oben JE. Laboratory of Nutrition and Nutritional Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Yaounde I, Yaounde, Cameroon.

Side effects
Irvingia gabonensis side effects may include headaches, sleep problems and intestinal gas, but researchers are still not sure about this.

Composition
The stem, fruit and root of this plant contain oftannins, saponins, alkaloids and anthraquinones but no cardiac glycosides.

Research
Interdiscip Toxicol. 2014. Protective effect of Irvingia gabonensis stem bark extract on cadmium-induced nephrotoxicity in rats.

Raw Material Suppliers
Ecuadorian Rainforest, LLC., a NJ supplier of natural ingredients, is now offering irvingia gabonensis, an African botanical that has been evaluated to assist those with weight management and weight loss. Also known as wild mango and bush mango, studies have been conducted on its effects of irvingia gabonensis on body weight and blood lipids on obese subjects.

I wanted to know if Ecuadorian Rainforest is a reputable store / company to receive raw herbs, powers, etc., from? I'm receiving a sample of the Irvingia Gabonensis from them and also wanted to ask how to I mixed this, with food, drink, etc.?
   I don't have personal experience with this company so I do not know about their quality control, whether it is excellent or poor. As to the herb itself, it is a new one for me and I have little experience with it at this time.