Sabinsa corporation is a manufacturer and supplier of herbal extracts, cosmeceuticals, minerals and chemicals.
March 1 2016

Sabinsa, a vitamin company, has brought to market more than 50 standardized botanical extracts, including BioPerine. BioPerine is a standardized piperine extract obtained from the fruits of the Piper nigrum (black pepper) and/or Piper longum (long pepper). Sabinsa Corporation has introduced several Ayurvedic herbal extracts in the U.S. market.

Bacopin
Bioperine
Boswellin
Curcuminoids

Trials. 2015. Combining curcumin (C3-complex, Sabinsa) with standard care FOLFOX chemotherapy in patients with inoperable colorectal cancer (CUFOX): study protocol for a randomised control trial. The need for low toxicity adjuncts to standard care chemotherapy in inoperable colorectal cancer, with potential to improve outcomes and decrease the side-effect burden, is well recognised. Addition of the low toxicity diet-derived agent, curcumin (the active ingredient of turmeric), to standard oxaliplatin-based therapy has shown promise in numerous pre-clinical studies.

2009
Sabinsa Corporation has issued a position paper on the safety of HCA as found in its branded ingredient products, specifically the Citrin range of extracts and GarCitrin. On May 1, 2009, the FDA issued a warning to consumers, based on adverse event reports, to stop using Hydroxycut products by Iovate Health Sciences Inc., of Oakville, Ontario and distributed by Iovate Health Sciences USA Inc. of Blasdell, NY. Although branded ingredients from Sabinsa Corporation do not occur in Hydroxycut, our scientific integrity dictates that we dispel any reservations on the safety of a healthful, natural, food ingredient, hydroxycitric acid, which forms a part of the active ingredients composition of Hydroxycut. The active ingredients in an example product in the Hydroxycut line include Garcinia cambogia fruit rind extract (supplying calcium hydroxycitrate and potassium hydroxycitrate); Chromium polynicotinate; Gymnema sylvestre leaf extract; caffeine; Green tea extract (supplying polyphenols, catechins, 15% w/w epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG); White tea extract (supplying polyphenols, catechins, 15% w/w epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG); Oolong tea extract supplying polyphenols, catechins, 15%w/w epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG); Ginger extract (supplying gingerols); Raspberry ketone; and Quercetin dihydrate. Based on the long history of food use of Garcinia cambogia fruits, the wealth of literature encompassing both preclinical and clinical studies, Sabinsa Corporation's clinical experience with Citrin and 15 years of successful marketing of Citrin extracts, there is no direct epidemiological or clinical evidence linking Garcinia cambogia fruit rind extract with hepatotoxicity. An exhaustive safety review by an independent panel of experts established GRAS affirmed status for Citrin K, the potassium salt of hydroxycitric acid, in 2007. The safety of G. cambogia extract and its active ingredient (-)-HCA is supported by a variety of animal as well as in vitro experimental studies. Additional evidence from multiple human clinical trials further supports the safety aspects of (-)-HCA. Because of its potential health benefits, there has been considerable effort to elucidate the mechanism of action of (-)-HCA. Relevant biological and toxicological studies on G. cambogia extract and (-)-HCA supporting the safety in use of CitrinŽK are included in the report. Sabinsa's mission is to provide alternative and complementary natural products for human nutrition and well-being. Over the past 20 years, Sabinsa has brought to market more than 100 standardized botanical extracts and privately funded several clinical studies in conjunction with prestigious institutions in support of these products. With more than 100 full time scientists conducting ongoing research in India and the United States, Sabinsa continues to develop and patent phytonutrients for the world market. All products intended for human consumption are certified Kosher, with many certified Halal.

Sabinsa Recognized by AHPA
2009
Sabinsa received the 2009 Herbal Industry Leader award from the American Herbal Products Association as a company that sets an example of outstanding business practices that work to move the industry forward above and beyond normal business practices. Additionally, Shaheen Majeed, Marketing Director, was elected to the AHPA board of directors.

Sabinsa defends patents
2007 - Sabinsa Corporation announced that it has successfully concluded its patent infringement lawsuit against DNP International, Inc. in the United States District Court. Sabinsa had filed suit against DNP International, Inc. for infringement of Sabinsa's patent governing the use of BioPerine (piperine black pepper extract), and Sabinsa's patent governing the use of ForsLean (Coleus forskohlii). Sabinsa alleged in its complaint that DNP has been unlawfully marketing and distributing piperine and Coleus forskohlii for uses that Sabinsa researched and patented in the late-1990's.

Bioperine is a Registered Trademark and a product of Sabinsa Corp., and its use is protected under U.S. Patent Nos. 5,536,506, 5,744,161, 5,972,382, and 6,054,585; European Patent No. EP0810868; Japanese Patent No. 3953513; and International Patents pending.

ForsLean is a Registered Trademark and a product of Sabinsa Corp., and its use is protected under U.S. Patent Nos. 5,804,596 and 6,607,712 and International Patents and Patents Pending.

Dose escalation of a curcuminoid formulation - by Sabinsa corporation.
BMC Complement Altern Med. 2006. Lao CD, Ruffin MT 4th, Normolle D, Heath DD, Murray SI, Bailey JM, Boggs ME, Crowell J, Rock CL, Brenner DE.
Division of Hematology-Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, 2150 CCGC, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.
Few systematic studies of curcumin's pharmacology and toxicology in humans have been performed. A dose escalation study was conducted to determine the maximum tolerated dose and safety of a single dose of standardized powder extract, uniformly milled curcumin (C3 Complextrade mark, Sabinsa Corporation). Healthy volunteers were administered escalating doses from 500 to 12,000 mg. Seven of twenty-four subjects (30%) experienced only minimal toxicity that did not appear to be dose-related. No curcumin was detected in the serum of subjects administered 500, 1,000, 2,000, 4,000, 6,000 or 8,000 mg. Low levels of curcumin were detected in two subjects administered 10,000 or 12,000 mg. The tolerance of curcumin in high single oral doses appears to be excellent. Given that achieving systemic bioavailability of curcumin or its metabolites may not be essential for colorectal cancer chemoprevention, these findings warrant further investigation for its utility as a long-term chemopreventive agent.